Laura Wingfield

Laura Wingfield is clearly the heroine of the play. Several factors make Laura Wingfield the heroine of the play: Laura is obviously the bottom of many conflicts and problems, Laura is the distinct character which holds the play and the characters, specifically together, Laura has the most dramatic evolution in the play, Laura’s character is easy to relate to and audience easily sympathizes with Laura.

Glass Menagerie evolves around her incapability to put herself out in the real world, which has brought about more problems to the family. Although, she is less prominent in the play in terms of lines, she is often represented by different symbols- blue roses, glass menagerie, glass unicorn, and the fire escape. Like the Glass Menagerie, Laura is bland with other people yet gives immense peculiar delight when directed aright. Laura is presented in the play as a delicate yet peculiar maiden who in the oddest ways the person who brings the household together.

The other characters see her differently. Amanda thinks Laura could turn her into what she could have been while Tom and Jim as well sees her as person set apart from the world. Laura has defied these perceptions of her through the course of the play, frequently unnoticed. Laura’s attraction to Jim in high school and Laura’s decision to quit going to typing class clearly indicates that she has a will of her own in contrast to the transparent glass menagerie that she is repeatedly being represented in the play.  Laura conflict within herself caused several conflicts between Tom and Amanda. Their fights are mostly about her and their reconciliation is due to her as well. It is evident that the other characters are deeply concerned with her. Thus, more conflicts arise.

The disabled Laura has exude pure compassion in the course of the play, one specifically is the part in scene four where she is said to have wept over her belief that Tom is neither happy nor content with his life. This particular part proves that Laura is indeed set apart from the egocentricity that circulates the household. She is charming different from the way Amanda wants her. Laura is courageous and moral as the modern heroine is defined.  Even though she is very sensitive about her incapability, she is able to push it away as she responds to Jim when he kissed her. Contrary to her being a sociopath, she was able to open herself to Jim. But as Jim’s engagement was revealed to her, the hope of her overcoming her weakness is shattered to pieces as the unicorn loses its horn.

Laura’s distinct character made her the heroine without too much effort of being too much dramatic in the play. Laura’s eccentricity is easy to relate to compared to other characters. The cause of her inferiority complex is easily understood and her passion as well. Laura is indeed the heroine of the play and the other characters who may seem as the protagonist is simply characters giving meaning to Laura’s existence.