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Luis Sanchez 2nd The fundamentals of marriage have been seen throughout history with the golden “rule” always being trust, in some cases trust must be earned by persuasion. In a story that completely negates the meaning of trust such as Julius Caesar, it is still has a constant presence. The idea of trust is shown in a momentous scene with the character Portia attempting to persuade Brutus that he can entrust her, this point in the book can relate to a logos or pathos emotion.

In Act II of Julius Caesar, Portia uses emotional and logical appeal to convince Brutus that she is not only worthy, but as his wife, obligated to be informed of what is troubling him. Portia uses logical appeal at a heated point in the argument, to try and convince Brutus she has proven herself a wife in position to hear his problems. She uses facts that prove her stature as a woman as when she says, “I grant I am a women, but withal / A women well reputed, Cato’s daughter” (Shakespeare. II. I. 317-318).

In this line Portia herself can see that she is respectable, and states she has made “strong proof of (her) constancy. ” This is a point where she is not trying be passionate to Brutus, but to state legitament facts. Portia uses logical appeal in an attempted to make her husband confess to her. Portia not only proves that she is a women of good stature but also that they are married, and she is entitled to his trust. She introduces this point with the lines, “I grant I am a women, but withal / A women that Lord Brutus took to wife” (II. I. 315-316).

Portia acknowledges she is being taken for granted and seen as “no stronger than my sex. ” These few lines set up a dramatic moment in which Portia stabs her thigh, which in turn set Brutus off. Portia has throughout the brief moment in the confrontation tried to prove her reliable stature and also his agreement within marriage to let her into his personal challenges. When Portia first confronts Brutus of his gloomy behavior she uses a very strong emotional appeal as she is baffled by his sudden mysterious attitude. In her confusion Portia questions her relationship with Brutus when she tates, “Portia is Brutus’ harlot, not his wife” (II. I. 309). She believes she is only there for his “good pleasure. ” This is a strong moment in the scene as she is considering the possibility that her husband does not view her as a wife but rather as a person that is just present for his physical needs. Portia has no other choice but to ponder where she actually stands with Brutus because of his sudden secretive ways. As Portia emits a strong pathos appeal because as she expresses that she feels she is being mistreated and cheated in her marriage because of the lack of communication and trust.

She immensely shows this when she bluntly tells Brutus, “Within the bond of marriage… / Is it expected that I know no secrets / That pertain to you”(II. I. 331-3330)? She questions why within their marriage there is no trust and questions the purpose of their “vows of love”. All the emotion Portia expresses at this point in the scene is pouring out of her as she is in a position where, because of the loss of communication, she is not informed and not understanding of the situation. The idea of marriage and persuasion in this scene play a massive role as it incorporates the emotional and logical perspectives of what is being said.

Portia tries to convince Brutus that she is worthy of being informed of his personal issues by setting out facts that prove she is an ideal women and deserves his trust. She also uses their marriage to show Brutus that within the “bonds of marriage”, she is entitled to be informed of what take place in his life that could be potentially dangerous. The powerful attempt to earn Brutus’s trust through persuasion can have been seen as unnecessary. Brutus should have known that Portia was trustworthy and loving instead of Portia being forced into a position where she has to beg for something that should be automatic with the bond of marriage. `